Homer’s Do’s and Doh’s: Richards Trade v. Carter Trade and Richards Trade v. Nodl Waiver Loss

Paul Holmgren became the interim General Manager of the Philadelphia Flyers on October 22, 2006. That interim title was removed only weeks later on November 11. Holmgren was able to take a team that finished last in the National Hockey League, and rebuild it to make a deep run all the way to the Eastern Conference Finals the very next season.

Yes, some of Holmgren’s moves have been amazing, but he’s also a guy who has gotten this organization into some hot water with the salary cap and was forced to make deals that were head scratchers to say the least.

If you enjoyed our Dazzlers and Duds polltastic tournament feature, we’ve got another one all lined up for you. Flyers Faithful proudly presents Homer’s Do’s and Doh’s: Our Favorite and Least Favorite Deals Under Paul Holmgren.

Starting Monday, November 19, there will be a single bracket with 32 trades, signings, and waiver-wire claims and losses, to determine exactly which deal everyone thinks is Holmgren’s best so far, his less than favorable so far, and whether the good outweighs the bad or vice-versa.

I don’t think anyone can deny that it’s been a real entertaining and exciting time in Flyers history with Holmgren at the helm. That’s a fact. But is Holmgren the king of exchange swinging, or does his penchant for quick fixes get him into more trouble than he’s worth?
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Yesterday’s Results:
The Giroux extension handily defeated the Meszaros trade, and the Zherdev signing was no match for the Shelley signing.

Today’s contestants:

Mike Richards and Rob Bordson to Los Angeles Kings for Wayne Simmonds, Brayden Schenn, and 2012 second-round pick
write-up courtesy of Dain S

Some people hate this trade, but I love it. I know, I know, the Kings won the Cup with Richards and if he hadn’t been traded maybe the Flyers would have…stop. It was time for Richards to go, he needed a change of scenery and the Flyers needed to change the culture in the room.

Frankly, the Kings gave up way more than the Flyers did. Rob Bordson was a throw-in, but Wayne Simmonds, who is 3 years younger, had 10 more goals than Richards during the regular season. Add in Braydon Schenn, who in limited action last year (18 points in 54 regular season games and 9 points in 11 playoff games) showed why he was a number one pick in 2009.

The Flyers got younger, bigger and better by trading Richards. Richards was and is a great player, but you need to give to get and that’s exactly what Homer did with this trade.

Jeff Carter to Columbus Blue Jackets for Jakub Voracek, 2011 first-round pick (Sean Couturier), and 2011 thrd-round pick (Nick Cousins)
write-up courtesy of Marc Siciliano

Jeff Carter is a pretty good hockey player, but it just wasn’t working for him in Philadelphia. That came to a head when both he and Mike Richards were traded on June 23, 2011. The thing is, you won’t find many people questioning the trade of #17 like you will the trade of #18, a sentiment seemingly felt even before the emergence of Sean Couturier and Nick Cousins. 

Paul Holmgren fleeced the Blue Jackets. You can argue that Jakub Voracek and the 3rd that was Nick Cousins might even have been enough to make this trade a win, but the icing on the cake is the 8th overall pick that turned into Sean Couturier. At just 19 years of age, he could prove to be the best player in a trade that happened before he even entered the league. 

Filed under the laughable category: also there to potentially draft was blue chip defensive prospect Dougie Hamilton, a prospect the Flyers apparently considered. With his projected future as a franchise defensemen, you have to think he’ll give Jack Johnson a run for his money as the better long-term defensemen – a thought that can’t help Blue Jackets fans sleep at night. But at least you have the All-Star game coming up? Never mind, that just got cancelled. Sorry Jackets fans!

Which Paul Holmgren deal was better?

  • Jeff Carter to Columbus Blue Jackets for Jakub Voracek, 2011 1st round pick (Sean Couturier), and 2011 3rd round pick (Nick Cousins) (89%, 32 Votes)
  • Mike Richards and Rob Bordson to Los Angeles Kings for Wayne Simmonds, Brayden Schenn, and 2012 2nd round pick (11%, 4 Votes)

Total Voters: 36

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Mike Richards and Rob Bordson to Los Angeles Kings for Wayne Simmonds, Brayden Schenn, and 2012 second-round pick
write-up courtesy of Estebomb

Mike Richards and Rob Bordson to Los Angeles Kings for Wayne Simmonds, Brayden Schenn, and 2012 second-round pick Brayden Schenn and Wayne Simmonds have been strong players for the Flyers, but who trades their captain away? The Flyers did when they decided it was time for a change.

It was one thing to trade Jeff Carter, a talented player who was often criticized for not showing enough heart or hustle in a town that values that above everything. It was something else entirely to trade Mike Richards, as hard working and intense of a player as I’ve ever seen in Philadelphia.

The real issue with losing Richards was losing one of the most defensively responsible forwards in the game. The Flyers seemed more offensively dynamic this past season, but they didn’t have the same backcheck. Richards was a young star and captain of this team for a reason. Trading him was a mistake.

Andreas Nodl lost to Carolina Hurricanes via waivers
write-up courtesy of Kevin Christmann

My distaste for the waiving and subsequent claiming by Carolina of Andreas Nodl has little to do with hockey. Nodl was not an exceptional player. There were legitimate reasons for wanting to be rid of him. Frankly, Nodl was probably surpassed on the depth chart by better, younger, cheaper players. He could no longer be freely sent to the AHL. By being rid of him the Flyers could free up a contract spot, a little bit of cap space, and give Nodl an opportunity in another organization. That all makes perfect sense to me.

My problem is…”gauging interest”. Yes, “gauging interest”. Paul Holmgren stated that Nodl was waived so that they could “gauge interest” in him. Somebody please tell me how that makes any sense whatsoever?

What are the two potential outcomes here?

1)      If there is no interest, he is not claimed. You have learned there is no interest, and you still have the player.

2)      If there is interest, he will be claimed (who wouldn’t want a player they were interested in, for free?). You have learned there is interest, and you no longer have the player.

My number one requirement of a General Manager is to effectively manage their assets. Based on the information that Paul Holmgren gave us, the waiving of Nodl was the opposite of that.

What he should have said/done:

Let’s gauge interest: we made some calls, not much happened,we couldn’t work something out; so we decided to waive him. It opens up a contract spot, a little space, and it gives Nodl a chance somewhere.

What he DID say/do:

Let’s gauge interest: I’ll waive him.

Which Paul Homgren deal was worse?

  • Andreas Nodl lost to Carolina Hurricanes via Waivers (73%, 24 Votes)
  • Mike Richards and Rob Bordson to Los Angeles Kings for Wayne Simmonds, Brayden Schenn, and 2012 2nd round pick (27%, 9 Votes)

Total Voters: 33

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