RICE & MICE: ACL injuries

Last week I wrote about my experience as an athlete that had an anterior cruciate ligament injury. This week I’d like to cover the importance of the ACL and why the mere mention of an ACL injury strikes fear into many athletes. The ACL is one of the four major ligaments of the knee. The medial and lateral collateral ligaments are located on the inside and outside portion of the knee, respectively. The oft-injured ACL and its neighbor the posterior cruciate ligament are located inside the knee joint. Even though ACL injuries are not thought of as a common hockey …

RICE & MICE: My ACL injury

Since I started writing for Flyers Faithful, a lingering thought has been in the not-so-distant depths of my mind to write about ACL injuries. It was not so long ago that a torn anterior cruciate ligament of the knee was a death sentence of sorts for most athletes.  It is an injury that is near and dear to my heart, or knee, rather. This will be a multi-part contribution as I am able to give medical, surgical and patient perspectives on this particular injury. I’ll start with the patient perspective. It was a gorgeous, albeit hot, Saturday in May in 1998. …

RICE & MICE: Hip pointers

A hip pointer usually results from a direct blow to either the outside edge of the pelvis (the iliac crest), or the outer aspect of the hip (greater trochanter of the femur) and is an extremely painful injury. The bone and overlying muscle are often bruised, and the pain can be intense and even be felt when, laughing or coughing. Bleeding usually occurs around the front and side of the hip, into the abdominals and gluteus muscles. This bleeding causes swelling and makes movement of the hip very painful. Some players can develop a hematoma, or “pocket of blood” in …

RICE & MICE: The phenomenon of delayed-onset muscle soreness

While not technically an injury, delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) is a phenomenon that every athlete experiences and can cause significant discomfort and pain. DOMS occurs in response to increased exertion and can also occur after “new” activities and exercises. The delayed onset peaks in 1-2 days following exertion and the soreness usually will resolve in around 4 days, though full recovery may take a week. An older school of thought attributed DOMS to a lactic acid build up in muscles. Lactic acid accumulation can cause some discomfort during and immediately after exercise, but only lasts an hour or so. …

RICE & MICE: (Medial) Collateral Damage

RICE & MICE will periodically review injuries that are common, uncommon or just plain unique in hockey. I hope to provide some insight to the “how’s, why’s, and when’s” of the injuries that might keep players out of the lineup. The medial collateral ligament or MCL is one of the oft injured ligaments in contact sports, especially ice hockey and football. As its name indicates, the MCL is on the medial or inside part of each knee. It is most often injured when contact is made to the lateral or outer portion of the knee, however the injury can also occur …