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CBA 101: A Recap

As we get closer and closer to the expiration of the current Collective Bargaining Agreement, and hopefully the creation of a new one — not to mention that I feel I’ve just about covered every critical topic — I thought I’d put together a recap of sorts, since it would be nice to have everything in one place for people to quickly and easily see what they may have missed. Waivers and Re-entry Waivers and why it means Marc-Andre Bourdon has a far better chance of making this team than Erik Gustafsson. 35+ Contracts and why Chris Pronger can never retire. Slide …

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CBA 101: The Bonus Cushion and Bonus Overages

One aspect of the upcoming  (It is coming right? Eventually?) new Collective Bargaining Agreement (CBA) that I am particularly interested about is the concept of Bonus Cushions and Bonus Overages. I’ve seen a number of people assume that the Bonus Cushion will exist, because it has before and, well, why wouldn’t it? I’ve also seen a seemingly equal number of people that don’t believe it will be included. Cue, the mumbo jumbo Section 50.5(h): (h) Accounting for Performance Bonuses. No SPC may contain Performance Bonuses except in accordance with Section 50.2(b)(i)(C) above. For purposes of a Club’s Upper Limit and Lower Limit, as …

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CBA 101: The Kovalchuk Rule

During the 2010-2011 offseason the New Jersey Devils landed the grand prize of Free Agency, Ilya Kovalchuk, when he was signed to a 17 year $102 million contract. That contract was, as many expected at the time, rejected by the NHL because it was deemed to circumvent the salary cap. At the time, Kovalchuk was 27 years old, so the contract would take him to age 44. Ultimately, the contract was re-worked to a 15 year $100 million deal, and the Devils were penalized to the tune of $3 million in cash, a third round pick in 2011, and a …

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CBA 101: No-trade and no-movement clauses

The standard player contract (SPC) of a Group 3 unrestricted free agent can contain a specific clause which prevents the player from being involuntarily moved from their current team. There are two types of clauses, the no-trade clause and the no-movement clause. As you might imagine, the no-trade clause prevents a player from being traded to another team without their express permission. A no-movement clause not only prevents the player from being traded, but also prevents their relocation by loan or waivers as well. So a player with a no-movement clause could not be sent down to the AHL without agreeing (which, …

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CBA 101: Contract Buy-outs

There are a limited number of ways that a team is able to get out of a contract given to one of their players. One such way is to buy  out the contract, which relieves of the team of their contractual obligation to the player, but does still result in “dead cap space” which is essentially cap space being used on a player that isn’t with the club. Typically, a team would exercise a buy out in order to get out of a bad contract in order to see some cap relief, much like the New York Islanders with Alexei …

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